Casually just interviewed Elizabeth Banks…

Lily (for HerCampus) and I (The Prospect) just interviewed Elizabeth Banks (Hunger Games Effie Trinket, Pitch Perfect) about her new movie coming May 2nd, Walk of Shame.

Oh, and went to an advance press screening of the film yesterday in Manhattan. #what

Look out for the article next Friday, May 2nd on TP!

OH MY GOSH

Also some other updates on my college life:

  • Working as an online tutor for InstaEDU (because of a money management article I wrote for The Prospect) 
  • Scored an opportunity shadowing multiple doctors for five weeks this May-June!
  • I’m actually still alive I swear I wish I didn’t only reblog on this
  • 21 credits next semester COME AT ME ORGANIC CHEM
  • Finals start next week. SOS: Send hugs, Kleenex, and chocolate. 
jewsee-medicalstudent
jewsee-medicalstudent:

The death of a cell.
This picture is an amazing 3D illustration of apoptosis. The word “apoptosis” originates from Ancient Greek ἀπό, “away from” and πτῶσις, “falling” and it is a regulated process of cell death. 
There are two ways of cell death: necrosis and apoptosis. Necrosis is a form of traumatic cell death that results from acute cellular injury, and it usually causes inflammation, because of cell’s content released outside in the extracellular fluid. Apoptosis, on the other hand, could confer advantages during an organism’s lifecycle and it produces cell fragments called apoptotic bodies that phagocytic cells are able to engulf and quickly remove, before the cell’s content spills out onto surrounding cells, causing damage.
A cell initiates intracellular apoptotic signaling in response to a stress, which may bring about cell suicide. The binding of nuclear receptors by glucocorticoids, heat, radiation, nutrient deprivation, viral infection, hypoxia and increased intracellular calcium concentration, for example, by damage to the membrane, can all trigger the release of intracellular apoptotic signals by a damaged cell. 
Research in and around apoptosis has increased substantially since the early 1990s. In addition to its importance as a biological phenomenon, defective apoptotic processes have been implicated in an extensive variety of diseases. Excessive apoptosis causes atrophy, whereas an insufficient amount results in uncontrolled cell proliferation, such as cancer.
(Source).

jewsee-medicalstudent:

The death of a cell.

This picture is an amazing 3D illustration of apoptosis. The word “apoptosis” originates from Ancient Greek ἀπό, “away from” and πτῶσις, “falling” and it is a regulated process of cell death.

There are two ways of cell death: necrosis and apoptosis. Necrosis is a form of traumatic cell death that results from acute cellular injury, and it usually causes inflammation, because of cell’s content released outside in the extracellular fluid. Apoptosis, on the other hand, could confer advantages during an organism’s lifecycle and it produces cell fragments called apoptotic bodies that phagocytic cells are able to engulf and quickly remove, before the cell’s content spills out onto surrounding cells, causing damage.

A cell initiates intracellular apoptotic signaling in response to a stress, which may bring about cell suicide. The binding of nuclear receptors by glucocorticoids, heat, radiation, nutrient deprivation, viral infection, hypoxia and increased intracellular calcium concentration, for example, by damage to the membrane, can all trigger the release of intracellular apoptotic signals by a damaged cell. 

Research in and around apoptosis has increased substantially since the early 1990s. In addition to its importance as a biological phenomenon, defective apoptotic processes have been implicated in an extensive variety of diseases. Excessive apoptosis causes atrophy, whereas an insufficient amount results in uncontrolled cell proliferation, such as cancer.

(Source).

365rulesforpremeds
365rulesforpremeds:

We’ve been receiving a lot of questions about what to focus on during undergrad in addition to academics, research, shadowing, volunteering, clinical experience, and other typical pre-med activities.  
While it is important to focus on these activities, remember that college is a time for personal growth.  Someone who can only list pre-med related activities on a resume or can only carry a conversation about medicine or academics is not a well-rounded applicant and overall, not a very interesting person.  Medicine may be your passion, but it shouldn’t be the only thing that you enjoy in life. 
As medical students, we know that college provides you with many unique opportunities to indulge in activities that are not available in medical school (typically because we spend a lot more time studying now in comparison).
Take advantage of the dance groups, tutoring positions, environmental restoration activities, political debates, guest speakers, theater productions, art & photography shows, and other non-medical activities or clubs available to undergraduate students.  College is the best time to discover your hidden talent or artistic outlet, enjoy the experience!

365rulesforpremeds:

We’ve been receiving a lot of questions about what to focus on during undergrad in addition to academics, research, shadowing, volunteering, clinical experience, and other typical pre-med activities.  

While it is important to focus on these activities, remember that college is a time for personal growth.  Someone who can only list pre-med related activities on a resume or can only carry a conversation about medicine or academics is not a well-rounded applicant and overall, not a very interesting person.  Medicine may be your passion, but it shouldn’t be the only thing that you enjoy in life. 

As medical students, we know that college provides you with many unique opportunities to indulge in activities that are not available in medical school (typically because we spend a lot more time studying now in comparison).

Take advantage of the dance groups, tutoring positions, environmental restoration activities, political debates, guest speakers, theater productions, art & photography shows, and other non-medical activities or clubs available to undergraduate students.  College is the best time to discover your hidden talent or artistic outlet, enjoy the experience!